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Reproductive health doctors concerned about impact of abortion bill on families seeking IVF

Nebraska could completely ban abortion if lawmakers bring back a bill from state senator Joni Albrecht. They rejected it in the ordinary session, but there is already talk of an extraordinary session later this year. Some reproductive doctors fear the bill will create barriers for women struggling with infertility. Albrecht says his bill would not affect in vitro fertilization. But an ALCU attorney says the language is ambiguous. who struggle with infertility. But for decades, these women have been there to help. “We’re on the side of creating life and building families and that’s what we do for a living, that’s what we love,” said reproductive health specialist Dr Abigail Delaney. But since the Supreme Court’s draft of Roe v. Wade has been leaked, they’ve had a lot of questions from many patients about what this means for their IVF journey. Doctors say some bills could impact IVF because conception happens outside the body with some fertility treatments. “Somehow the bills are written and if life starts at conception, and called beginning like conception, it becomes semi problematic for what we do,” Delaney said. So they want to educate people on how important IVF is to so many people. “There’s people everywhere, there’s people I work with and people I go to church with, and people my kids go to school with. And those kids wouldn’t be there and this family wouldn’t be here if they hadn’t had access to IVF,” said reproductive health specialist Dr. Meghan Oaks. The women say it’s not just for people struggling along with infertility, they also help people who are battling cancer preserve fertility and can stop genetic disorders by testing embryos.” Without this therapy, these diseases, for example, Huntington’s disease, cystic fibrosis, they go on, sickle cell disease and run through families and it’s something that like I said unless you were affected by it, or you knew someone with it, you wouldn’t have any idea or awareness that we can stop this in its tracks,” said Dr Elizabeth Weedin of Hea rtland for Reproductive Medicine. Albrecht says the concern is unfounded in the context of his bill, saying “only procedures employed on a pregnant woman with the intent of terminating her unborn child would be prohibited.” Albrecht said that if for some reason the woman carries multiple pregnancies after implantation and the situation creates a risk to her life, the bill’s exception for the life of the mother would apply. distortion. “But the ACLU is saying otherwise. To say the language of Albrecht’s bill is ambiguous. These women are saying they will continue to fight for their patients. “I really want to make sure we emphasize that you know, these bills go much further than I think people want them to be,” said Dr. Elizabeth Constance, of Heartland for Reproductive Medicine. All the women say they want their patients to know that their embryos are safe and nothing has changed. They say they will continue to work to make sure it stays that way.

Nebraska could completely ban abortion if lawmakers bring back a bill from state senator Joni Albrecht.

They rejected it in the ordinary session, but there is already talk of an extraordinary session later this year.

Some reproductive doctors fear the bill will create barriers for women struggling with infertility.

Albrecht says his bill would not affect in vitro fertilization.

But an ALCU attorney says the language is ambiguous.

The doctors KETV NewsWatch 7 spoke to want to educate people about IVF and why people use it.

One in eight doctors say that’s the number of couples struggling with infertility. But for decades, these women have been there to help.

“We’re on the side of creating life and building families and that’s what we do for a living, that’s what we love,” said reproductive health specialist Dr Abigail Delaney.

But since the Supreme Court’s draft of Roe v. Wade leaked, they’ve had a lot of questions from many patients about what this means for their IVF journey.

Doctors say some bills could impact IVF because conception happens outside the body with some fertility treatments.

“Somehow the bills are written and if life starts at conception, and called beginning like conception, it becomes semi problematic for what we do,” Delaney said.

So they want to educate people on how important IVF is to so many people.

“There’s people everywhere, there’s people I work with and people I go to church with, and people my kids go to school with. And those kids wouldn’t be there and this family wouldn’t be here if they hadn’t had access to IVF,” said reproductive health specialist Dr Meghan Oaks.

The women say it’s not just for people struggling with infertility, it also helps those battling cancer preserve their fertility and can stop genetic disorders by testing embryos.

“Without this therapy, these diseases, for example, Huntington’s disease, cystic fibrosis, they continue, sickle cell disease and run through families and that’s something that, as I said, unless you don’t affected by it, or know someone with it, you would have no idea or awareness that we can stop this in its tracks,” said Dr. Elizabeth Weedin of Heartland for Reproductive Medicine.

Albrecht says the concern is unfounded in the context of his bill, saying “only procedures employed on a pregnant woman with the intent of terminating her unborn child would be prohibited.”

Albrecht says that if for some reason the woman carries multiple pregnancies after implantation and the situation puts her life at risk, the bill’s exception for the life of the mother would apply.

She adds, “Opponents of the bill in the legislature know this or should know this. Their use of IVF as a scare tactic is an intentional distortion.”

But the ACLU says otherwise.

To say the language of Albrecht’s bill is ambiguous.

These women say they will continue to fight for their patients.

“I really want to make sure we highlight that you know, these bills go a lot further than what I think people want them to be,” said Dr. Elizabeth Constance, of Heartland for Reproductive Medicine.

All the women say they want their patients to know that their embryos are safe and nothing has changed. They say they will continue to work to make sure it stays that way.

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